Monthly Archives: August 2013

Buying Directly from a Farmer – Why Do It?

Here at Leaping Lamb Farm, we’re getting ready for the fall processing of the lambs born last spring. As Scottie talks to our customers about putting down their deposits to hold their purchases, it’s gotten me to thinking about why my husband and I choose to buy animal shares directly from farmers.

  • chasingsheep-scaled500x500We like directly supporting small, local farms with our dollars, rather than middle-men and shipping companies.
  • We know the farmers and the conditions in which the animals live.
  • We know what the animals are eating, and that they have room to roam and graze.
  • When buying a whole animal (more about that in a minute), we know that we’re buying one animal, rather than cuts or ground meat coming from several different animals.
  • In our opinion… it just plain tastes better! (Plus, none of those foam trays!)

In the past, we’ve purchased a third of a pig (not enough!), a whole pig, and twice have purchased a quarter of a cow. We’ve also purchased a lamb from Leaping Lamb Farm and will definitely do so again this year.

Wondering about freezer space? That was a big question for me when we started buying shares in animals — how much freezer space did I really need? Depending on the animal you’re buying, you may need a chest freezer. A lamb from Leaping Lamb Farm takes up about two paper grocery sacks, while even a quarter cow and half a pig take up much more room.

USDA?

So, how come at some farms the customer buys a share of a live animal, versus buying cuts of meat in some farm stores or at farmers’ markets? It has to do with whether or not the animals were processed by a USDA-inspected facility. Our lambs are processed at a “custom-exempt” state licensed facility located in Harrisburg. Such facilities are exempt from continuous inspection (they are inspected once or twice a year by the USDA), but may only process livestock for the owner, the owner’s family, and non-paying guests*. This is why farmers will sell you a share of a live animal, making you the owner of that animal. Here at Leaping Lamb Farm, we sell whole lambs, and our customers can make arrangements themselves to split the share, if they wish.

Without getting too much into the politics of it all, there just aren’t enough USDA-inspected facilities in Oregon, and those that exist are extremely busy, and require hauling the animals long distances. Hauling is a stressful occurrence for the animals, which many people believe can affect the flavor of the meat.

*Source: Check out this informative pamphlet from OSU about using custom-exempt facilities in Oregon. It’s written for the farmer, but I’ve found it really useful as a customer to understand the process.

ProPasture_final2

Pro Pasture

Leaping Lamb Farm is a partner of the Pro Pasture Campaign by Friends of Family Farmers.

The flagship program of  this campaign is Pro Pasture Fridays (PPF). PPF is farmers, ranchers, consumers, food purchasers, retail stores, chefs and restaurateurs joining together to promote agricultural practices that put a high value on family farms, animal welfare, public health, the planet and our local rural economies.

We encourage you to take a look around your area and support your local farmers who are raising pasture-fed animals!

Stay tuned for an upcoming post about cuts of lamb, and recipes!

Photo Recap of Sleep with the Sheep – Part 2

As promised, here are some more photos from the Sleep with the Sheep campout we held here at the farm on August 10th! Thanks again to our wonderful guests for making this such a fun event to host.

A littlethunder and rain drove us all into the barn for a bit, where we played a few games.

A little thunder and rain drove us all into the barn for a bit, where we played a few games.

 

Good friend and Alsea librarian, Nancy Cooke, read some stories.

Good friend and Alsea librarian, Nancy Cooke, read some stories. 

 

Remember going somewhere as a kid and making a friend for the day?

Remember going somewhere as a kid and making a friend for the day?

 

What is it about a creek that kids love so much?

What is it about a creek that kids love so much?

 

Is it the splashing?

Is it the splashing?

 

Or the wading?

Or the wading?

 

Or digging into the mud?

Or digging into the mud?

We may never have all the answers, but it’s clear that the creek is a huge draw for kids! On Sunday morning, with help from one of the dads, the kids spent a couple of hours stripping bark from fallen branches, attaching twigs and leaves and fashioning little rafts to float in the water.

Good night, sheep!

Good night, sheep!

 

(Photos: Dennis Rivera)

Photo Recap of Sleep with the Sheep – Part 1

We had such a good time with our guests at the Sleep with the Sheep event! We are talking about the possibility of repeating it next year, with a few alterations to the schedule and perhaps the food — so stay tuned if you missed it this year. We’ll keep you posted!

Here are some photos from the weekend, with more to follow in a second post…

Our biggest attractions were the animals, and the creek. The guests loved feeding the sheep...

Our biggest attractions were the animals, and the creek. The guests loved feeding the sheep…

... and they loved feeding Paco. And Paco loved the attention, as you knew he would!

… and they loved feeding Paco. And Paco loved the attention, as you knew he would!

Paco said, on his Facebook page, that this was such a good day. He loves guests.

Tater and Moralecia were well behaved. Well, Tater did decide to open a gate that night, but he didn't get ALL the way out. And not into the barn, thank goodness.

Tater and Moralecia were well behaved. Well, Tater did decide to open a gate that night, but he didn’t get ALL the way out. And not into the barn, thank goodness.

 

Boots the lamb came out to sit on some laps. This guest had the most wonderful dress - with chickens on it!

Boots the lamb came out to sit on some laps. This guest had the most wonderful dress – with chickens on it!

 

We learned about keeping gates open or closed. (The rule is, leave them how you found them!)

We learned about keeping gates open or closed. (The rule is, leave them how you found them!)

 

We also played games...

We also played games…

 

... and played in the creek for a long time!

… and played in the creek for a long time!

We’ll have more photos up soon!

 

 (Photos: Dennis Rivera)

The Escape Artist

Tater the Terrible” has a partner in crime here at the farm.

She’s sneaky. She’s quick.

We will often catch a quick glimpse of her scuttling into some landscaping, but chasing her or trying to keep her penned in is just a futile exercise that ends up with a breathless farmer and a chicken prancing away, tail feathers held high.

Frankie. Many of our guests have come to know her ways.

We never catch her getting out, but we recently caught her in the act of getting back in…

fjNHNK3P17_fCnGNoKogDPOT0mlFHfmLeTt5aWocXzE

Up…

1zl_hqPk5U2NzkmxIkWMTEg3sipPQYJsIZmZ0hz7_lg

… and over…

rJk1HGkXliq2eHGMAt0RFAStdBzESIBXR3vWo4hCHBU

And a triumphant landing.

All Rights Reserved. Copyright 2013 Scottie Jones
Photos by Dennis Rivera